Discovery @ UCSB Seminars List

Consult the list below for information on current and future Discovery @ UCSB seminars.

For details on each Discovery @ UCSB seminar format, see the Discovery @ UCSB information page. For information on seminars from past quarters, see the archived lists page.

Use these links to navigate to the list for the quarter you are looking for:

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Winter 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AA: Latin American Culture: From Conquest to Independence
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0100-0250
GIRV 2116

Enrollment Code:             62216   

This class will present an overview of the literature and culture of Latin America through the analysis of some of the most relevant works written in the last five centuries across the Americas. It will also present an overview of the most salient aspects of Latin American identity.

Professor of Medieval and Early Modern literature, history, and culture, Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. Dr. Cortijo is the author of over 50 books and 150 articles.

Professor Castillo's areas of instruction and research include: Nineteenth and twentieth-century Spanish-American literature, from the Romantics to the Avant-Garde, with a special focus on Hispanic Modernismo and Posmodernismo. Additional areas of interest are: poetry and poetics; modern philosophy and history of ideas; contemporary literary theory; Cuban and Puerto Rican literature; nineteenth century Peninsular, and contemporary Spanish-American literature.

cortijo@ucsb.edu

INT 89AD: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Professor Craig Carlson, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Fridays
0200-0350
GIRV 2129

Enrollment Code:             28738   

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology.  Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Professor Poole earned his B.A. at Trinity College, and his Ph.D. in molecular biology at UCSD. His research areas are the molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs in Drosophila, and also contact-dependent growth inhibition in bacteria. Dr. Poole is a former Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.

Dr. Carlson earned his BA degree at Colby College and his PhD in marine science at the University of Maryland where he investigated the role that marine microbes play in governing the carbon cycle of open ocean ecosystems. As a Postdoctoral scholar at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) he focused on the biogeochemistry of dissolved organic matter in ocean systems. He joined BIOS faculty in 1996 and remained there until joining EEMB in 2001. Dr. Carlson is a former Chair of EEMB and is a member of UCSB's Marine Science Institute. He is lead PI or Co-PI on several federally sponsored projects in Microbial Oceanography.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 4205

Enrollment Code:             28746                   

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities

Professor Singer has been teaching in Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. Dr. Singer is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. He has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             28761                   

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Professor Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             28779   

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot's fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94MH: Great Love Requires Great Risks:  Social Movements, Sacrifice, and Radical Activism
Professor Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval, Chicana/o Studies

1ST 5 Tuesdays
0900-1050
SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             65771

This seminar will explore what makes people move; in other words, what causes them to get involved in a social movement and then take ever increasing risks, including sacrificing potentially one's life.  Special focus will be on activists that rely on hunger strikes, civil disobedience, and other "extreme" strategies to create a more just world.  We will also examine what we can do, as students, faculty, and everyday people to stop injustice and suffering.

Professor Armbruster-Sandoval has been teaching the Chicana/o Studies Department since 1998.  His research focuses on social movements, racial studies, and globalization.  He has published two books and long been involved in activist organizations.  He is currently working on a new book on the Chicana/o Movement in Los Angeles after the end of the Vietnam War.

ralpharmbruster@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah deVries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Tuesdays
1000-1150
PSBN 4606

Enrollment Code:             65300

Gallup Polls show that two thirds of Americans do not think global warming is a threat and almost half of all Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should we really worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternative medicine really quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say?  Should schools and universities teach all sides of these controversies? Explore the history, politics, and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana and Chicano Studies

1st 6 Mondays (NEW DAY)
0900-1050 (NEW TIME)
HSSB 3202 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             28787   

This seminar will consist of showing film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino experience in historical perspective.   Professor Garcia will discuss the historical context of each film.  After the film is shown, students will share their reflections on it.

Mario Garcia is a Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has published numerous books on Chicano history including on immigration, civil rights, leadership, labor, and faith politics as well as an expert on oral history.  Dr. Garcia teaches courses on Chicano history, autobiography, religion, and Introduction to Chicano Studies.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays (new day)
0400-0450
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             28795

LAUNCH PAD is the new play development program at UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance. With the playwright in residence, we produce a "preview production" of a new play each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class, observe rehearsals and see the performance to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.

Risa Brainin, Professor and freelance director. Directorial credits include plays at American Players Theatre, Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival and more. Artistic Director of UCSB's LAUNCH PAD. www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             62224

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94QC: Politics and Film
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Wednesdays
0900-0950
GIRV 2110

Enrollment Code:             62232

In this course we shall discuss ten films that have a strong political theme or themes.  These shall include Frank Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Don Siegel's Invasion of the Body Snatchers, King Vidor's The Fountainhead, and Ridley Scott's Blade Runner.  Student evaluation will be based upon class participation and short viewer-response analyses.  Essays are due noon the day before class; they should be submitted via e-mail to the address provided. They should, in no more than one page, identify two questions about the week's film that the student would like to address in class, and explain about each (a) why it seems particularly important and (b) why its answer is so unclear as to require discussion.

Professor Andrew Norris generally teaches and writes political philosophy, though he has also published on aesthetics and film.  He is the author of Becoming Who We Are: Politics and Practical Philosophy in the Work of Stanley Cavell (Oxford University Press, 2017) and over thirty articles.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Campus Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise and Sports Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:             28811

This seminar is designed to explore elements of health and wellness.  Class meetings will introduce students to a variety of campus resources and activities that promote a healthy lifestyle.  Topics include making healthy food choices, stress management, fitness activities, adventure program activities and personal health assessments.

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TF: Dedicated to Serve: Local Law Enforcement Uncensored
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

1st 6 Wednesdays
0400-0550
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:             28829

With media, politicians, athletes and quasi-celebrities provoking anti-law enforcement sentiment, it's easy to second-guess policies and practices from the comfort of your own home. Intelligent citizens know that they should inform themselves with accurate facts from the source before reaching a conclusion on such issues. This seminar will facilitate that process through a series of talks from five local law enforcement agencies. Members from each branch of law enforcement will explain their function and fit within Santa Barbara County and what life is like for them as members of this community on and off duty. Direct interaction between students and speakers will follow as students ask class-created questions with time for general discussion in a mutually respectful, safe, and candid atmosphere. Safety tips and career insights are also highlighted.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. teaches Writing for Public Speaking (105PS), Business Writing (107B), and Legal Writing (107L). Her research interests range from the function and process of collaborative work in business spaces to the intersection, interference, and imposition of laws on the workplace environment. She has been a member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992 and retired in 2015 from her local legal practice specializing in contract, small business and personal injury law.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

***ONSITE EVENTS***
INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 (Lecture)
0400-0450
MUSIC 2224

UCSB An Evening of Chamber Music and Dance
Saturday, February 23, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Wind Ensemble
Thursday, March 7, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Music Faculty Showcase 
Monday, March 11, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Jazz Ensemble
Wednesday, March 13, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Enrollment Code:             28845

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required. Please note that all events are free to UCSB students with ID who are enrolled in the course.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

***EXCURSION***
INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist Art, Literature and Culture from Picasso to Ai Weiwei
Professor Enda Duffy, English

1st 3 Fridays
1000-1150
GIRV 2110
~and~
Saturday, January 26, 2019 excursion to Santa Barbara Art Museum

Enrollment Code:             62240

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed. This course surveys these changes with a focus on London/Paris, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine Blast. This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature, and then asks: what has happened to art since?   We then spend a half-day together interacting with some impressionist, modernist, and contemporary art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum.

Enda Duffy is the Arnhold Presidential Department Chair of the Englsih Dept. He teaches courses in twentieth century literature and culture, critical theory, Irish literature, and James Joyce.  His most recent book was 'The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism.'  He has completed a book on emigration and literature, and is at work on one on energy, stress and adrenaline in modern culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED/FIELD TRIP INCLUDED***
INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Tuesdays
1000-1050
GIRV 1106

Enrollment Code:             65730

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal. We will also go on a field trip to the Santa Barbara Museum of Art to encounter works of visual art directly.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics (formerly The Future of Global Justice)
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing

Tuesdays
1200-1250
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             28878

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher Education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathleen Patterson, Writing Program

1st 5 Mondays
1200-0150
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             28886

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember and forget about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as "Gauchos."

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94US: Was There a Historical Trojan War?
Professor Ralph Gallucci, Classics

Tuesdays
0900-0950
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             76927

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960’s most scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today many scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94UT: Oral Interpreting: Hands On!
Professor Aline Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays and Wednesdays               
0800-0850
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             28910

This course comprises topics that are important to develop skills for interpreting into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Dr. Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is the director of the Bilingualism, Translation, and Cognition Laboratory. Dr. Ferreira was post-doctoral research fellow in psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She is the coeditor of the books The Handbook of Translation and Cognition (Wiley Blackwell), The Development of Translation Competence: Theories and Methodologies from Psycholinguistics and Cognitive Science, (Cambridge Scholars Publishing), and Psycholinguistic and cognitive inquiries into translation and interpreting (John Benjamins. She has also published studies in journals and books such as Translation and Interpreting Studies, Translation, Cognition and Behavior, Spanish Journal of Applied Linguistics, Cognitive control and consequences of multilingualism (John Benjamins Publishing), Reading and Writing (Springer), Intersections of language and social justice (International Society for Language Studies, Inc.), and The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Linguistics (Routledge) (among others).

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0500-0550
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             65870

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary. In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94VC: Great Scientists Speak Again
Professor Stuart Feinstein, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Wednesdays     
1200-1250
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             64006

Some of the greatest biologists of all time will make guest presentations, including Charles Darwin (evolution), Gregor Mendel (genetics) and Louis Pasteur (microbiology).  We will also explore some great 20th century biologists, including Watson/Crick/Franklin/Wilkins (DNA), Levi-Montalcini/Cohen (nerve growth factors) and Bishop/Varmus (oncogenes).

Professor Feinstein is a neurobiologist and biochemist whose research focuses upon the development and degeneration of the nervous system, most notably Alzheimer's and related dementias. He also has a passion for history, especially of the sciences, and baseball.

feinstei@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94VD: Puppet Design and Fabrication
Professor Christina McCarthy, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays     
0500-0550
HSSB 1105 (new location)

Enrollment Code:             63990

Build your own rod style puppet while immersing yourself in learning about various building techniques translatable to many puppet styles including shadow puppets, marionettes, and large scale parade puppets. Each student will design and fabricate their own puppet and have the opportunity to delve into simple mechanisms for realistic body movement.

Christina McCarthy is a multimedia artist working in dance, theater, puppetry and film, embracing all of these forms as she seeks to tell stories in innovative ways. As a former student of Engineering, she decodes the mechanisms to give puppets realistic movement qualities with rudimentary building materials. She is a maker of animated performance space.

cmccarthy@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VE: Sensors and Sensing Technology
Professor Hua Lee, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Thursdays
0500-0550
HFH 4164

Enrollment Code:             65524

The course will provide an overview of sensors and sensing technology as well as the applications in the industry and the direct relationships to the engineering curriculum in signal processing, communication, microwave, optics, acoustics, and computer hardware and software systems.

Professor Hua Lee received his BS degree from National Taiwan University in 1974, and MS and Ph.D. degree from UC Santa Barbara in 1978 and 1980 respectively. He returned to UC Santa Barbara in 1990 where he is currently Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Prior to his return to UCSB, he was on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests cover the areas of imaging system optimization, high-performance image formation algorithms, synthetic aperture radar and sonar systems, acoustic microscopy, microwave nondestructive evaluation, tera-hertz imaging, tomographic ground-penetrating radar imaging, and reconfigurable sensing systems.

hualee@ece.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VF: Empowering People Through Collective Theater and Arts
Professor Ruth Hellier-Tinoco, Music

Tuesdays (with extended sessions as noted below)
0500-0550
HSSB 1143

Enrollment Code:             65532

Which strategies and practices of theatre and other arts are useful for empowering people to work collaboratively? This seminar focuses on the work of one playwright and artist in Mexico, Petrona de la Cruz Cruz and one New York based Columbian theater artist, Doris Difarnecio, to explore successful approaches and practices.  The seminar includes readings and workshops with UCSB Professor Hellier-Tinoco and one exceptional visit by the artists Petrona de la Cruz Cruz and Doris Difarnecio.

Extended sessions: some hours on Feb 19 and Feb 20, 2019.

As a creative artist and scholar, Professor Hellier-Tinoco combines interests in performing arts, politics, Mexican studies, identity and environmental issues. Dr. Hellier-Tinoco teaches in the departments of music and theater/dance, with affiliations in feminist studies and Latin American and Iberian Studies, with expertise in experimental performance-making and contemporary politics.

rhellier-tinoco@music.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VG: Collaborating To Build An Interactive Media Design
Professor Greg Mitchell, Theater and Dance

1st 5 TUE
0300-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             73866

In this course the students and instructor will work in a hands on fashion to create a piece of interactive multimedia art which will be on public display on the campus.  The display will showcase the creation of the artwork as it evolves under the hands of the class-collaborators.  In class demos showing various equipment, media creation tools, live processing applications, and execution software’s will familiarize students with the programs and their capabilities.  Students will suggest ideas, introduce content, and build media from scratch that will become the core of the artwork.

Greg Mitchell is a an award winning lighting, set and multimedia designer who works around the world creating visual art for live performance, installations and interactive video art.

gmitchell@ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AC: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
0300-0450
MUSIC 1145

Enrollment Code:             29157

On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources: six illustrated lectures (100 minutes each plus a short break, 10 hours in all) in which Professor Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other music and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Professor Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB's Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 186AM: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0200-0250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             62257

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AP: Intro to Mayan Astronomy
Professor Gerardo Aldana, Chicano/ Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             65086

This seminar provides a hands-on workshop approach to understanding Ancient Mayan calendric systems and their application to ritual astronomical interests.  It will also initiate consideration of how astronomy was utilized for political purposes.

Professor Aldana works at the intersection of Anthropological Archaeology, Chicana/o Studies and Indigenous Studies with a focus on Ancient Mayan culture and science.

gvaldana@ucsb.com

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AQ: Loving in the War Years - 35th Anniversary!
Professor Dolores Ines Casillas, Chicano and Chicana Studies

Wednesdays
0200-0250
SH 1713

Enrollment Code:             65961

This seminar reads and discusses portions of Cherrie Moraga's pathbreaking book, Loving in the War Years. The Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies is highlighting this book during the winter 2019 academic quarter. Loving in the War Years consists of creative prose that speaks to Moraga's coming of age as both a Chicana and a lesbian during the politically conservative 1980s. In honor of its 35th anniversary, we re-read and revisit the book within the contemporary political, queered moment. The seminar will also attend a campus lecture and take part in a Q&A discussion session with the author.

Dolores Ines Casillas is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies and a Faculty Affiliate of Film & Media Studies, Applied Linguistics, and the Center for Information Technology and Society (CITS) at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Her research focuses on immigrant engagement with U.S. Spanish-language media.  She is the author of Sounds of Belonging: U.S. Spanish-language Radio and Public Advocacy (NYU Press, 2014), co-editor with Maria Elena Cepeda (Williams College) of the Companion to Latina/o Media Studies (Routledge Press, 2016) and co-editor with Mary Bucholtz and Jin Sook Lee (UC Santa Barbara) of Feeling It: Language, Race and Affect in Latinx Youth Learning (Routledge Press, 2018).  Her current book project examines how Spanish-dominant communities rely on specific media industries in the United States from DVD rentals via Red Box and smartphone applications such as What’s App, to language learning media, both online and audio-lingual, like Open English and Ingles Sin Barreras. She teaches courses on U.S. Spanish-language and bilingual media, radio and sound practices, language politics and accent studies, and Chicana/o popular culture.

casillas@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AR: Collaborating To Build An Interactive Media Design
Professor Greg Mitchell, Theater and Dance

1st 5 TUE
0300-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             73874

In this course the students and instructor will work in a hands on fashion to create a piece of interactive multimedia art which will be on public display on the campus.  The display will showcase the creation of the artwork as it evolves under the hands of the class-collaborators.  In class demos showing various equipment, media creation tools, live processing applications, and execution software’s will familiarize students with the programs and their capabilities.  Students will suggest ideas, introduce content, and build media from scratch that will become the core of the artwork.

Greg Mitchell is a an award winning lighting, set and multimedia designer who works around the world creating visual art for live performance, installations and interactive video art.

gmitchell@ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AC: Seeking Social Justice: Community-Based Participatory Research on Health Disparities
Professor Melissa Morgan-Consoli, Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology
Professor Melissa Smith, Institute for Social, Behavioral and Economic Research

Tuesdays (January 8, 22 and February 5, 19 and March 5)
0430-0620
LIBR 1576

Enrollment Code:             65201

This Seminar provides students an opportunity to learn about a social justice-based research methodology and, partnering with community-serving organizations, to seek solutions to community health and mental health problems. Students will learn about community-based participatory research (CBPR), applying it within the social context of underrepresented populations living in California.

Melissa Morgan Consoli is a Counseling Psychologist and Associate Professor in the Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology program at UCSB. Her research interests include issues of resilience, thriving, social justice and immigration, with an emphasis on Latino/a populations. She utilizes quantitative, mixed, qualitative, and CBPR approaches in her work.

Melissa Smith is Director of Health Equity Initiatives at UCSB, and a physician who has worked in poor communities in the US and Latin America. She has been involved in CBPR with local partners, and developed community health worker training programs and public health manuals for community health and empowerment.

mlmorg@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AD: What's "Latin" in Latin America?
Professor Dorota Dutsch, Classics
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Mondays 
0500-0650
GIRV 2123

Enrollment Code:             65219

When we hear terms like “Latin America” or “Latinx” we usually do not associate them with things like the Roman Empire or Ancient Greece. However, these apparently separate realms have deep historical, cultural and political connections. This seminar explores these relationships.

Dorota Dutsch is Associate Professor in the Department of Classics. Her research focuses on social performance (comprising anything from comedy to funeral rites). Her current book project explores the ways in which the literary figures of women philosophers, especially that of Pythagoras’s wife Theano, engaged with ancient ideas about the gender of knowledge

Juan Pablo Lupi is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. His research and teaching interests include literature and intellectual history in Latin America; Cuban and Venezuelan literature; critical theory; literature and philosophy; and literature and science.

dorota.dutsch@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AE: Cheers! The History and Science of Ale, Beer, and Brewers
Professor Mike Wilton, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Professor Jarett Henderson, History

Thursdays
1000-1150 am
HSSB 4020

Enrollment Code:             70078

For centuries beer and ale have played a pivotal role in people's social, cultural, and political lives across the globe. In this seminar students will be introduced to this history alongside the science of brewing. Students will discover how yeast (a single-celled organism) is harnessed by brewers to produce beer as well as how those who did the brewing changed with technology, time, and geography.

Dr. Wilton is interested in how microorganisms interact with each other and their environment to produce food and drink, or cause infection. After earning his PhD from the University of Toronto, Mike arrived at UCSB to teach in the biology program. His research focuses on the isolation and identification of bacteria that can produce antibiotics.

Dr. Henderson is interested in the social and cultural lives of those who called the nineteenth century British Empire home. He received his Ph.D from York University and is an expert in the history of sex, gender, and vice. In 2018, he joined the UCSB History Department where he teaches courses on the history of colonialism, gender, and sexuality and is conducting research on the social and sexual politics of colonial rule.

mike.wilton@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AC: Love and Desire from the Middle Ages to the Present in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0500-0650
GIRV 1119

Enrollment Code: 59659

This seminar offers an overview of the way our conceptualization of Love and Desire has shaped Western thought from its inception to the present. Love lies at the intersection of sexual passion, religious mysticism, and social utopia. Conceptualized as a human need for creating a relationship with the other we will begin by examining how the Greeks believed "love" encompassed the notions of eros, philia, agape and Charistia/Love/Charity. From the most natural and simple sexual desire (eros), love moved to embrace the need to establish a connection with others through friendship (philia) or with the societal group at large (agape). A human mystical longing to transcend the sphere of the merely human was also recognized through the concept of Charistia/Love/Charity. To explore how Love and Desire have been conceptualized and explored throughout the centuries in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, we will pay attention to literature, painting, and music.

Dr. Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations.

Professor Bermudez' areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, and Equatorial Guinea. Her critical work focuses on feminism, women's studies, poetic discourses, and politics. She is the author of Las dinamicas del deseo: subjetividad y lenguaje en la poesia espanola contemporanea (1997) and La esfinge de la escritura: la poesia etica de Blanca Varela (2005). She was the editor of the Special Issue La Espana Constitucional: Democracia y Cultura, 1978-2008 for the Revista de Estudios Hispanicos (2010), and co-edited the volume From Stateless Nations to Postnational Spain/De Naciones sin estado a la Espana Postnacional (2002), the Special Issue on Spanish Popular Music Studies for the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies (2009), and the Mediterranean Matrix: Memory, Migration, Movement for the Journal of Mediterranean Studies (2016).  Her articles have appeared in critical collections and journals in the U.S. and abroad including Modern Language Notes, Revista de Estudios Hispanicos, Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Siglo XX/Twentieth Century, Letras femeninas, and Anuario de Estudios Literarios Galegos. Her current research focuses on Iberian feminisms (with Roberta Johnson). Her third book, Rocking the Boat: Race and Migration in Contemporary Spanish Music, is forthcoming.

cortijo@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 89AI: Star Wars: Psychological and Literary Perspectives
Professor Steve Smith, Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology
Professor Kara Mae Brown, Writing Program

Mondays
1000-1150 am
ED 1215

Enrollment Code:             66142

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away students critically examined the original Star Wars trilogy from a psychological and literary perspective. Students will study Star Wars as an example of Joseph Campbell's heroic journey, with special attention to the psychology of heroes and the film's storytelling techniques.

Steve Smith, Ph.D. is clinical psychologist on the faculties of the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology and the College of Creative Studies.  His interests include the psychology of men and boys, psychological assessment, the mental health needs of athletes, and ethical uses of the Jedi Mind Trick.

Kara Mae Brown, MFA is a Lecturer in the Writing Program and the College of Creative Studies. Her teaching and research interests include writing pedagogy, creative writing, and feminist theories of The Force.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - First Year Exploration Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2018
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Monday, October 1 through Friday, October 5, 2018
0100-0250pm (NEW TIME!)
PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code:             66167

In the week of October 1st the 2018 Nobel prizes will be announced. We will find out how one gets nominated and follow the announcements in the different fields on the days they happen. We will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94ER: Is There Life Elsewhere in the Universe?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  59774

Is Earth the only place in the universe where life appeared? Does or did life exist on Mars? Does intelligent life exist elsewhere? This seminar will explore the question of whether we’re alone in the Universe.  Topics will include the origins of life, the search for life (past and present) in the universe, the search for extraterrestrial intelligent life, the future of life on Earth, and the impact of any such discoveries on science and society.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:  59618

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities. 

George Singer has been a Professor of Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. Professor Singer is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. He has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art:  Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
1000-1150
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code: 27532

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, PBS, and The TODAY Show and has exhibited throughout the world. He is the author of several books and the recipient of the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award. kipfulbeck.com

seaweed@arts.ucsb.edu

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana and Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays (NEW DAY!)
0300-0450
SH 4503

Enrollment Code: 27540

This seminar will focus on the discussion of contemporary political issues both domestic and international.  Prof. Garcia will provide historical context to this discussion but students will lead the discussions on a range of issues facing the United States today including the fall elections.

Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He teaches courses on the Chicano/Latino experiences including immigration, civil rights, religion, and oral history.  He is the author of more than twenty books in Chicano history and his books have won many awards.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code: 27557

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 58164

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot's fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 27581

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Campus Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise Sport Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code: 27607

This seminar is designed to explore elements of health and wellness.  Class meetings will introduce students to a variety of campus resources and activities that promote a healthy lifestyle.  Topics include making healthy food choices, stress management, fitness activities, adventure program activities and personal health assessments. 

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical thinking: the Most Important Thing You Will Likely Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Wednesdays
0600-0650
GIRV 1108

We will read and discuss papers on critical thinking covering broad disciplines, including but not limited to science.

Professor Reich’s science research is on epigenetics, enzyme mechanisms, drug design and delivery.  His science education research is on how to improve large lecture format courses to engage students in critical thinking and in teaching K-12 students how science works.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Lecture
Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018
4:00-5:00pm
Room 2224, Music Building

Flute Ensemble Rehearsal
Wednesday, November 28, 2018
7:00-8:00 p.m.
Karl Geiringer Hall, Music Building

Wind Ensemble Concert
Thursday, November 29, 2018
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, Music Building

Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players Concert
Monday, December 3, 2018
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, Music Building

Enrollment Code: 27631

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

***Excursion***
INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist Art, Literature and Culture from Picasso to Ai Weiwei
Professor Enda Duffy, English

1st 3 Fridays
1000-1150
GIRV 2110
~and~
Excursion on Saturday, October 20
1000-0150
Santa Barbara Art Museum

Enrollment Code: 27649

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed.  This course surveys these changes with a focus on London/Paris, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine Blast. This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature, and then asks: what has happened to art since?   We then spend a half-day together interacting with some impressionist, modernist, and contemporary art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum.

Enda Duffy is the Arnhold Presidential Dept. Chair of the English Dept. He teaches courses in twentieth century literature and culture, critical theory, Irish literature, and James Joyce.  His most recent book was ‘The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism,’ he has completed a book on emigration and literature, and is at work on one on energy, stress and adrenaline in modern culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94TK: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0300-0350
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27656

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TN: Puzzling Problems in Science and Technology
Professor Behrooz Parhami, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wednesdays
0400-0450
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code: 58172

Science/technology challenges are puzzle-like, in that their solutions require insight and out-of-the-box thinking. Many of these problems are related to popular math/logic puzzles in terms of the pertinent insights and solution methods. We will discuss several such problems and link them to a number of puzzles, such as guessing the next term in a series (recommender systems), optical illusions (3D modeling of objects), and mazes (GPS and other navigation aids).

Behrooz Parhami (PhD, UCLA) is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and former Associate Dean for Academic Personnel, College of Engineering, at UCSB. A Life Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IET and British Computer Society, he has written six textbooks and more than 300 peer-reviewed technical papers. Professionally, he serves on journal editorial boards and conference program committees and is also active in technical consulting. His hobby consists of solving many different kinds of puzzles.

parhami@ece.ucsb.edu

INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Mondays
0100-0150
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 27680

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing Program

Tuesdays
0400-0450
SH 1432

Enrollment Code: 59626

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher Education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

***JUST ADDED***
***EXCURSION-BASED***
INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathleen Patterson, Writing Program

1st 5 Mondays
0900-1050 am
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             66159

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember and forget about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as Gauchos.

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

INT 94UX: Contemporary Women's Writing
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
1230-0120
SH 2635

Enrollment Code: 59543

The seminar focuses on contemporary women's writing and the issues it brings to the fore for the reader and critic. We will discuss questions of women's self-representation and power, migration and postcoloniality, sexuality, work, femininity and transgression (ex: the figure of the witch or of "difficult women"). Authors include Maryse Conde', Jeannette Winterson, Lucia Berlin, Roxanne Gay, and Angela Carter.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English and Feminist Studies at UCSB. She teaches classes on twentieth century literature and culture, cinema and literature, the representation of women, theories of gender and sexualities. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body, and another book on "stuff" and its meaning and uses in contemporary cultures of abundance. She is now working on a new book on work, the work ethic, and not-doing.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94UY: Playwriting Master Class
Professor Frances Cowhig, Theater and Dance

Thursdays
1100-1250
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             60897

Start a new play from scratch! In this five-session master class, students will engage in visual and textual generative activities designed to help them imagine the worlds, characters and conflicts that will inhabit their play, and also draft and workshop in class in-progress scenes from their play. Participants will be exposed to and practice via scene work the nuts and bolts of dramatic writing, and learn skills that will be applicable for writing for both stage and screen. No experience necessary.

Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig is an internationally produced playwright whose work has been staged at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre of Great Britain, Manhattan Theater Club, the Goodman Theatre, Trafalgar Studios 2 on the West End and the Jazsef Katona Theater in Budapest. In 2018 her most recent work, Snow in Midsummer, a contemporary adaptation of the Yuan play by Guan Hanqing, will receive its North American premiere at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, in a production directed by Justin Audibert. 

fcowhig@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94UZ: The Modern Girl Around the World
Professor Sabine Fruhstuck, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies

Thursdays
1000-1050
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code: 59600

The Modern Girl emerged quite literally around the world in the first half of the twentieth century. Often adorned in provocative fashions and known by a variety of names, Modern Girls appeared to disregard roles of dutiful daughter, wife, and mother. Contemporary journalists, politicians, social scientists, and the general public debated whether Modern Girls were looking for sexual, economic, or political emancipation, and wondered whether the Modern Girl might be little more than an image, a hollow product of clever advertising campaigns and the new commodity culture. We will explore all of these possibilities as well as some Modern Girls™ take on them.

Sabine Fruhstuck is interested in the study of modern and contemporary Japanese culture and its relationship to the rest of the world. Among other publications, she is the author of Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan (2017), Uneasy Warriors: Gender, Memory and Popular Culture in the Japanese Army (2007), and Colonizing Sex: Sexology and Social Control in Modern Japan (2003).

fruhstuck@eastasian.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Thursdays
1200-1250 pm
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             71399

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary.  In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VB: What Can Latin America Teach Us About the US?
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0600-0650 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:             71407

“Populism”, “erosion of democracy”, “foreign meddling”: These are some of terms often used to describe the current situation of the country. In this seminar we will explore how Latin America—its history, peoples and cultures—may offer a few valuable lessons on how to understand US society and politics today.

Professor Juan Pablo Lupi is a native of Venezuela. He teaches courses on Latin American literature, intellectual history, and literary theory. His research interests include Cuban and Venezuelan history and culture, contemporary Latin American poetry, and the relationships between literature, philosophy, science and technology.

juan.lupi@ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AF: Psychological Science in the World of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0550 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             71662

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, religious belief and skepticism, the mind-body problem, concepts of the supernatural, how to avoid incest, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

Tamsin German is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research concerns the cognitive foundations of the human capacity for understanding other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thinking, such as how we represent and reason about supernatural entities like Gods and ghosts.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

***FIELD WORK***
INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy: Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Mondays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:  66183

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations. Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

Jimerson@ucsb.edu

INT 186AK: Studying Abroad for Transfer Students
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Thursdays
0400-0450
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  66175

This course is designed to prepare transfer students for studying abroad.  We will cover a variety of topics related to this topic:  program options, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, financial aid and housing, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus draft a scholarship essay.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimages, Islam and Modernity, modern Islamic movements, and religion and the culinary cultures of the Middle East.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

campo@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AL: Religious and Other Unusual Experiences
Professor Ann Taves, Religious Studies

Thursdays
1000-1050 am
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             71670

We know that people all over the world have unusual experiences, but we don't know how beliefs and practices influence the frequency and interpretation of such experiences.  We are in the process of figuring out if some experiences are consistently interpreted as religious or if that varies by culture and tradition. We have designed the Inventory of Non-Ordinary Experiences (INOE) to help us answer these questions.  In this seminar, you will have a chance to take the Inventory yourself and understand why we see both similarities and differences between people in the US and India.

Professor Ann Taves is an internationally recognized expert on religious experience with a particular focus on how unusual experiences are interpreted in very different ways within and across cultures.  She teaches courses on religious experience, new religious movements, and comparing worldviews as well as supervising the interdisciplinary Religion, Experience, and Mind Lab Group.

anntaves@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AM: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
1200-1250 pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code:             71688

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AN: Cartographies of Spain's Capital: Madrid in Literature and Film
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0100-0150 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             71696

The purpose of this Honors Seminar is to familiarize students with some of the literary, cinematic, and musical representations of the city capital of Spain from the late 19th Century from the decades preceding the end of the Franco dictatorship (1939-1975) to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the late 20th Century with Madrid identified both as postmodern space during the years of La Movida (1975-1985) and as a capital of the Global South.

Professor Bermudez's areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, Equatorial Guinea, and Latin America, particularly Peru. Her latest publication is the co-edition of the volume, ‘Cartographies of Madrid: Contesting Urban Space at the Crossroads of the Global South and the Global North’ (2018).

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

***CANCELLED***
INT 186AO: Los Angeles' Initial Water Supply
Professor Jordan Clark, Earth Science

Tuesdays
0900-0950 am
GIRV 1106

Enrollment Code:            

This seminar will examine Los Angeles' efforts to secure a stable water supply from the Owen's Valley.  The primary text is Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner.  There will also be a 1-day long field trip, on Friday, November 30th, to the Jawbone Canyon Siphon and the St. Francis Dam failure site.

Prof. Clark is an environmental scientist who works in geochemistry and hydrology.  Much of his current research relates to water supply problems in California.  In particular, he investigates groundwater flow near Managed Aquifer Recharge sites.  He has taught a version of this class numerous times.

jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu