Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology

Claudia Gottstein

Location:
6313 Bio II

Research Project

The longterm goal of the project is i) to investigate differences in surface marker expression of cancer stem cells compared to normal stem cells and mature cancer cells, ii) to correlate these differences to other cellular phenotypes and iii) to exploit these differences therapeutically. We work with antibody phage display libraries to isolate specific antibodies to breast cancer stem cells, and we investigate the surface expression patterns on cytospins and tissues of breast cancer cells and normal cells.

Undergraduate Contribution

A subproject is to stain breast cancer tissues and normal tissues with candidate antibodies for breast cancer stem cells. This entails sectioning of frozen tissues, and immunofluorescent staining of these tissues, as well as microscopic analysis of the sections. There is a possibility to also assist in protein expression and cell culture later in the project, depending on the general project results.

Requirements

Experience in tissue sectioning and handling is a plus but not required. Please submit CV, transcripts, cover letter and the contact information of one reference. GPA reqs for MCDB199.

English

Andrew Griffin

Location:
South Hall 2524

Research Project

The project works in collaboration with Director Patricia Fumerton to expand research on the English Broadside Ballad Archive. The project makes public facsimile images of early English ballads printed during the 16th and 17th centuries, and this expansion works to digitize previously created facsimile transcriptions into modernized replicas of the early modern print on the original broadside ballads.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates work alongside graduate students to carefully transcribe the original text of the ballads, in order to convert that transcribed text into high quality digital replicas in Photoshop. Students in the process learn much about early modern print culture, early modern popular culture, and archival transcription practices.

Requirements

90 units of course credit, 3.0 GPA. In addition, students should be reliable, and have a detail-oriented work ethic and basic knowledge of Microsoft Office and Adobe.

Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook

Location:
South Hall 2503

Research Project

The "Early Modern British Theater: Access" project is creating a searchable database that collects and catalogs multimedia resources relating to British theater and dramatic literature, 1500-1800. Our goal is to help instructors and students get a sense of the collaborative and multisensorial aspects of theater in the period. Part of our team research involves identifying current 'best practices' for digital humanities projects. We aim to 'go public' in early 2015; right now our 'front end' (only) is available athttp://embta.english.ucsb.edu/about.

Undergraduate Contribution

Following EMBTA protocols and under graduate-student supervision, undergrad team members will review and standardize the items already identified for the database. They will also identify and report on new resources (databases, performance materials, other publications).

Requirements

Reliable; detail-oriented. Interest in theater studies and / or digital humanities projects a plus!

Earth Science

Bradley Hacker

Location:
2120 Webb Hall

Research Project

Dating of rocks and minerals using the U-Pb and other isotopic methods. Determining metamorphic pressure and temperature using thermobarometry.

Undergraduate Contribution

Mineral separation, petrography, electron-probe micro-analysis, electron-backscatter diffraction, ICP mass spectrometry.

Requirements

Mineralogy

Sociology

Lisa Hajjar

Location:
SSMS 3018

Research Project

I need help organizing the research I have been conducting over the past 15 years for a book project, The War in Court: The Legal Campaign against US Torture. Specifically, this research includes approximately 200 interviews with lawyers who have worked in some capacity to challenge the US torture program in the context of the "war on terror," as well as field notes from my observations at Guantanamo military commission trials, and conferences and other torture-related events. I need to create a searchable database of this research, a summary of each item, and an electronic scan of the materials.

Undergraduate Contribution

An undergraduate research assistant would use my materials to create the database, summarize each item, and produce electronic scans. The student will work with me to devise a framework for the searchable database and delineate the key elements to be included in summaries (e.g., names of interviewees, dates and locations, nature of interviewee's work, topics discussed in the interview, etc). This would provide the student with the opportunity to learn by my example how longitudinal qualitative research is conducted, and how to organize such research in a user-friendly manner for a book project.

Requirements

The student must be an upper-level student who has taken at least one of the following courses and earned a grade of B+ or higher: Soc 173 (Sociology of Law), Soc 173R (Sociology of Human Rights). The student must be highly organized, capable of learning how to use a database software (TBD), and interested in the topic of my research.

Psychological and Brain Sciences

David Hamilton

Location:
Bldg. 251, Rm. 3819
805-893-2456

Research Project

People form first impressions of others quickly and easily, even from minimal information. Research has shown that people routinely infer trait qualities about a person from information they learn about the person’s behaviors. In fact, this happens spontaneously, without intention and even without the perceivers’ awareness that they are making these inferences. In other words, they begin forming a first impression immediately and automatically. Our research has shown that perceivers spontaneously make similar trait inferences about groups, based on the behaviors performed by a group. Again, perceivers are forming group impressions immediately and automatically, without being aware they are doing so.

The current project builds upon and extends this line of research. A series of studies (1-2 per quarter) are planned in which we will determine whether perceivers can spontaneously form simultaneous, yet different, impressions of two or more groups. The paradigm used in these studies can determine whether this can happen even when people are not intending to do so (their task presumably is simply to remember the sentences) and they are not aware that they are in fact making those inferences. In these experiments we will present information about two different groups and will test whether two distinct impressions can be unconsciously formed and retained in memory under these conditions.  The results of these studies will be very informative regarding the nature of human inference processes in group and intergroup perception, with implications for foundations of stereotype formation.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates will assist in several phases of the research: preparation of experimental materials, conducting experimental sessions, data coding and entry, library research.

Requirements

3.0 GPA, Psychology majors only. 

Mary Hegarty

Location:
Bldg. 251, Rm.3812
893-3750

Research Project

This project will focus on individual difference and sex differences in various spatial abilities and skills, including mental and manual rotation and navigation in real and virtual environments.  A major question this work seeks to explore is how participants at different levels of spatial abilities use different strategies in performing spatial tasks.

Undergraduate Contribution

The contribution of the undergraduate involved in this work will include running participants, data management such as entry and coding, and organization of the research.

We are also interested in finding students with a computer science background who would be interested in programming experiments using virtual environment technologies.

Requirements

We require at least a 3.0 GPA and previous training as a lab assistant is preferable. Additionally, the student should be interested in spatial abilities and research in general.

Education

Danielle Harlow

Location:
ED 3105

Research Project

MOXI, the Wolf Museum of Exploration and Innovation is a new museum being built in Santa Barbara. We will be investigating how children and adults interact with the museum exhibits and the role of playful interactions, creative design, and making sense of observations in learning about science and engineering.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates will help by collecting data (observing, surveying, and interviewing visitors at MOXI), analyzing data and presenting reports.

Requirements

Interest in museums, informal science learning, teaching and/or working with children.

Location:
EDUC 3105

Research Project

We are investigating how children learn computer programming and how the curriculum supports their learning. We are working with children and teachers in local 4th-6th grade classrooms.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates will work with faculty and graduate students in multiple stages of the research project from collecting data data, transcribing video, and analyzing video data.

Requirements

Students should have some familiarity with block-based computer programming (scratch.mit.edu) or be willing to learn.

History

Tsuyoshi Hasegawa

Location:
Hssb 4252

Research Project

I am looking for an undergraduate research assistant with reading knowledge of Russian to assist me on my research on crime and police during the Russian Revolution in Petrograd, March 1917-Marcy 1918.

Undergraduate Contribution

Library work, copying, scanning, organizing notes

Requirements

Reading knowledge of Russian

Pages