Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Sociology

John Foran

Location:
3417 SSMS
893-8199

Research Project

“The Climate Justice Project” is an ongoing collaboration of UCSB-affiliated students, graduates, and myself on the global climate justice movement. We have conducted a number of in-depth interviews with climate activists at the last five U.N. climate summits including at Paris in December 2015, when a global climate treaty was signed. Our challenge is to contribute to the efficacy of global civil society in building a social movement capable of forcing the governments of the world to negotiate a binding, ambitious, and just climate treaty to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that are warming the planet, which the “Paris Agreement” does not accomplish.

At this network’s core is the principle of climate justice: the desire that all humans claim responsibility for our impact on the world’s climate, so that communities may reclaim their rights to “live well” with healthy, creative lives rather than to simply “live better” or consume more, and that together we construct a future based on equity, deep democracy, and cooperation.  This involves unlocking the creativity of everyone to re-imagine the world in which we live in order to make way for new possibilities.

The Climate Justice Project is excited to be part of this life-affirming movement.  Among our research products and projects are reports, scholarly articles, and videos. Our work can be viewed at www.climatejusticeproject.com and at www.iicat.org.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates have been working on this project for several years, in a variety of capacities: transcribing audio and video interviews with climate justice activists; making research notes on key books, articles, and other documents; helping log and edit video footage for films in the making, including a full-length film on the global youth climate justice movement, tentatively called "Not Yet the End of the World."

Requirements

There are no prerequisites except an interest in the topic.

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Peter Ford

Location:
4649C PSBN
2443

Research Project

The Ford lab researches biologically relevant small molecules such as CS2, NO, and CO. Projects involve synthesizing small molecule donors as well as nanoparticles to create systems for light activated small molecule release. In particular we have demonstrated the release of CS2 from dithiooxalate (DTO), a CS2 donor, and further studies are directed towards other reaction products. For example, the photocatalyzed reaction using quantum dots and DTO releases CS2.

Another project is concerned with developing new procedures for the conversion of biomass to chemicals and fuels.  We are working with catalysts prepared from Earth-abundant elements thus avoiding the consumption of irreplaceable rare elements

See website for details.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates are fully involved in the projects including synthesizing nanoparticles, small molecule donors, and studying their release using various instrumentation and techniques with guidance from graduate student mentors.

Requirements

Completion of the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry sequences and the associated labs. The other essential requirement is the strong desire to participate in a creative process that requires intellectual involvement and commitment.

East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies

Sabine Frühstück

Location:
HSSB 2232

Research Project

Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japan. In nine short chapters, this book will provide an introduction to the experiences of and debates about sex, gender, and sexuality with regards to males and females in modern and contemporary Japan. It will draw from and integrate historical, ethnographic, and cultural studies scholarship and emphasize moments of debate and conflict. In addition, it will include critical assessments of a select number of black and white visuals. Each chapter will be accompanied by both a short bibliography of key scholarship and a list of literary and film examples that represent or address the historical moments and issues described in the text—all in order to facilitate further exploration by a broad range of readers in and outside the academy.

Undergraduate Contribution

Reference search and verification, creation of a bibliography, summaries of publications, image searches.

Requirements

Excellent English, basic research and documentation skills, reliability, time management and communication skills. Good Japanese language skills a plus.

English

Patricia Fumerton

Location:
2506 South Hall
708-0540

Research Project

English Broadside Ballad Archive, http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu. This project is devoted to mounting online facsimile images, citations, transcriptions, and recordings of broadside ballads of the seventeenth century and earlier. Broadside ballads are large sheets (hence "broad) on which are printed many illustrations, a song, and a tune title.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates work alongside graduate students to create "facsimile transcriptions" (in which the student opens up a facsimile of the ballad in Photoshop and a transcription in Word, and then carefully replaces the original text of the ballad with the transcribed text, matching font size and spacing and preserving the ballad's ornamentation). Students also help catalogue ballads and convert ballads into TEI/XML using a handy easy-to-follow program called X-Balled. Students in the process learn much about early printing techniques, popular culture, Photoshop, and text encoding.

Requirements

Detail-oriented, reliable, and a basic knowledge of Photoshop.

Bishnupriya Ghosh

Location:
South Hall 2607A
893-3478

Research Project

The Catalyst Project supports four research assistants, members of the editorial board for the literary arts magazine, responsible for producing the 2015-16 issues of the magazine.

Undergraduate Contribution

The research assistants lead the production of the Catalyst magazine and related arts events in Isla Vista. This includes leading the writing, designing, and printing of the magazine copies as well as organizing and hosting events. The costs include designing and printing (5000+ per issue), art supplies (around $200-400), and events supplies (around $300-400).

Requirements

Editorial skills
Technical or design skills
Organizational ability
Collaborative capacity

Andrew Griffin

Location:
South Hall 2524

Research Project

The project works in collaboration with Director Patricia Fumerton to expand research on the English Broadside Ballad Archive. The project makes public facsimile images of early English ballads printed during the 16th and 17th centuries, and this expansion works to digitize previously created facsimile transcriptions into modernized replicas of the early modern print on the original broadside ballads.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates work alongside graduate students to carefully transcribe the original text of the ballads, in order to convert that transcribed text into high quality digital replicas in Photoshop. Students in the process learn much about early modern print culture, early modern popular culture, and archival transcription practices.

Requirements

90 units of course credit, 3.0 GPA. In addition, students should be reliable, and have a detail-oriented work ethic and basic knowledge of Microsoft Office and Adobe.

Psychological and Brain Sciences

Shelly Gable

Location:
Bldg.251, Rm.3837

Research Project

Our research looks at topics such as approach and avoidance motivation (the desire to go after positive outcomes vs. the desire to avoid negative outcomes), relationship and personal goals, personal goal support, relationship motives, capitalization, positive emotions, etc. A number of projects centered on motivation and relationship research will be going on in the lab. We conduct observational studies with couples, questionnaire studies, diary studies, as well a number of experimental studies.

Undergraduate Contribution

Responsibilities include running participants, coding data, entering data, brainstorming ideas for follow-up studies, preparing study materials, etc.

Requirements

We are looking for bright, responsible and reliable research assistants (no prior experience is necessary). Please complete our lab's application, located here:
https://collinslab.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_b9JeQub9geWGmrP

Earth Science

Phillip Gans

Location:
1034 Webb Hall
893-2642

Research Project

Investigation of the geologic evolution of various localities through a combination of field and analytical work. Geologic mapping, sample collecting, compilation of field data using GIS software, preparation of presentation graphics, statistical analysis of structural data, preparation and analysis of geologic samples using a variety of methods, including radiometric dating (40Ar/39Ar, U-Pb), petrographic studies, SEM and Microprobe.

Undergraduate Contribution

Assisting with field work, preparation of samples for petrographic and microstructural work, compilation and analysis of data using Excel, computer graphics using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, preparation of high purity mineral separates for geochronological analysis (crushing, grinding, sieving of rock samples, density and magnetic separations)

Requirements

Prefer some geologic background - ideal for entry level earth science majors. Experience with Excel and Adobe Creative Suite are desirable for some of the work.

Mechanical Engineering

Fredric Gibou

Location:
Engineering II Bld
805 893 7152

Research Project

The focus of our lab is the design and applications of novel computational methods. Applications range from the study of fluid flows to the simulation of solidification processes to the study of bioengineering topics.

Undergraduate Contribution

Typical undergraduate contributions range from the design and implementation of computational methods to the application of such methods to physical and biological phenomena.

Requirements

Good programing skills is viewed positively. Motivation and good analytical skills.

Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology

Claudia Gottstein

Location:
6313 Bio II

Research Project

The longterm goal of the project is i) to investigate differences in surface marker expression of cancer stem cells compared to normal stem cells and mature cancer cells, ii) to correlate these differences to other cellular phenotypes and iii) to exploit these differences therapeutically. We work with antibody phage display libraries to isolate specific antibodies to breast cancer stem cells, and we investigate the surface expression patterns on cytospins and tissues of breast cancer cells and normal cells.

Undergraduate Contribution

A subproject is to stain breast cancer tissues and normal tissues with candidate antibodies for breast cancer stem cells. This entails sectioning of frozen tissues, and immunofluorescent staining of these tissues, as well as microscopic analysis of the sections. There is a possibility to also assist in protein expression and cell culture later in the project, depending on the general project results.

Requirements

Experience in tissue sectioning and handling is a plus but not required. Please submit CV, transcripts, cover letter and the contact information of one reference. GPA reqs for MCDB199.

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