Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Feminist Studies

Edwina Barvosa

Location:
SH 1704
X5714

Research Project

Constructing Deliberative Democracy is an ongoing research project testing the hypothesis that some controversial issues are being democratized in America through contradictory elements of popular culture. These widely circulating elements give people the opportunity to informally debate and deliberate on controversial subjects. Through informal deliberations a public may sometimes reach a new majority opinion on a hot button issue. Such shifting opinions connect in complex ways to new legal and structural changes as the courts and electoral democracy reflect new public perspectives. Our current case study is on shifts in public opinion regarding LGBTQ civil rights between 1989 and 2014.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate researchers will perform targeted internet searches to locate examples of popular culture elements relevant to LGBTQ civil rights and changing public opinion between 1989 and 2014. Searches are clearly defined to key issues, key outlets (i.e. films, TV, blogs, mass market books, newspapers) and key time frames (a given year, a specific time after a key event). This research is thus a "guided scavenger hunt" through pop culture in which materials are collected, filed, and labeled for further analysis of the rate and effects of American pop culture on changing public opinion in American democracy.

Requirements

Requirements are: 1) personal access to a computer and the internet; 2) facility with MS Word including how to cut and paste from the web; 3) attention to detail; 4) ability to follow directions. It is also a helpful to be willing to learn Zotero or other digital filing or bibliographical database system.

Location:
SH 1704
X5714

Research Project

Constructing Deliberative Democracy is an ongoing research project testing the hypothesis that some controversial issues are being democratized in America through contradictory elements of popular culture. These widely circulating elements give people the opportunity to informally debate and deliberate on controversial subjects. Through informal deliberations a public may sometimes reach a new majority opinion on a hot button issue. Such shifting opinions connect in complex ways to new legal and structural changes as the courts and electoral democracy reflect new public perspectives. Our current case study is on shifts in public opinion regarding LGBTQ civil rights between 1989 and 2014.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate researchers will perform targeted internet searches to locate examples of popular culture elements relevant to LGBTQ civil rights and changing public opinion between 1989 and 2014. Searches are clearly defined to key issues, key outlets (i.e. films, TV, blogs, mass market books, newspapers) and key time frames (a given year, a specific time after a key event). This research is thus a "guided scavenger hunt" through pop culture in which materials are collected, filed, and labeled for further analysis of the rate and effects of American pop culture on changing public opinion in American democracy.

Requirements

Requirements are: 1) personal access to a computer and the internet; 2) facility with MS Word including how to cut and paste from the web; 3) attention to detail; 4) ability to follow directions. It is also a helpful to be willing to learn Zotero or other digital filing or bibliographical database system.

Education

Charles Bazerman

Location:
3208 Education
x7543

Research Project

The world and writing in undergraduate education. Undergraduates in different majors need to learn disciplinary practices and skills of identifying and recording relevant data, then analyzing that data and using the data as evidence within disciplinary reasoning.  This project will be looking at how students are introduced to these skills, how they are asked to practice them, and how they are supported in these tasks, starting with gen ed classes through senior capstone courses.  We will be looking at selected majors across the university.

Undergraduate Contribution

Students will help collect data from curriculum and course materials, observe and record classroom events, and conduct surveys and interviews.  Students will also help with preliminary analysis and interpretation.

Requirements

Second to fourth year standing. 3.0 GPA or higher. Interested in writing or educational issues. All majors welcome.

Julie Bianchini

Location:
ED 3153
805-893-4110

Research Project

We are investigating beginning science and mathematics teachers' understanding of how to teach English language learners. We are in the process of collecting and analyzing a large amount of qualitative data to answer our research questions -- audio recorded interviews, video recorded classroom lessons, and performance assessment portfolios.

Undergraduate Contribution

Students will become part of our research team. Primary responsibilities will be transcribing video recorded classroom lessons and qualitatively coding interview and classroom transcripts.

Requirements

Students should have a background in science, mathematics, or education; have an eye for details; and be willing to learn NVivo, a qualitative software program.

English

Felice Blake

Location:
South Hall 2702

Research Project

The Black Nostalgia Project examines how Black writers in the US think about the past. Given the current rhetoric on 'making America great again' (a phrase taken from the African American poet Langston Hughes), how do Black people think about the past in relation to the present and the future? I am researching 20th and 21st century literature, art, music, film, and television portrayals by Black artists and their representations of time. The project will produce a book manuscript and documentary.

Undergraduate Contribution

Research on different periods of cultural production from the New Negro Movement to Black Lives Matter. Collecting and organizing titles and abstracts of a variety of cultural products. Viewing of films and televisual programming as well as listening to a variety of 20th and 21st century musics (from bebop to hip hop and neosoul).

Requirements

Some course experience on African American or African Diasporic history, politics, and/or culture. Familiarity with library research engines. Interest in Black culture and politics.

Religious Studies

Joseph Blankholm

Location:
HSSB 3049

Research Project

I'm in the process of revalidating a database I built with a colleague in 2012 that collects basic information on all of the more than 1,400 local nonbeliever communities in the United States. We intend to use this updated database for a longitudinal study of these groups so we can understand whether they are growing in number and also what factors might lead to their formation. We recently published an article in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion based on the 2012 version, which demonstrates that nonbeliever communities are more likely to form in counties where there are proportionally more evangelicals.

Undergraduate Contribution

An undergraduate research assistant would contact groups listed in the 2012 database by phone or email in order to collect basic information and assess the group's level of activity. The student will be provided with email and phone scripts, including a basic questionnaire. This information will be used to update/revalidate the database.

Requirements

Students must have basic proficiency with Microsoft Excel and experience conducting qualitative research, including interviews. Ideally, the student would also have a strong interest in the area of research. Majors in Religious Studies, Sociology, and Anthropology preferred (though not a requirement).

Psychological and Brain Sciences

James Blascovich

Location:
Psychology East 38
x5082

Research Project

Research project focusing on the effects of stress on cardiovascular reactivity. Will include studies of the effects of stressful tasks on women and the overweight. Preferred but not essential: Social psychology (psych 102); Health psychology (psych 101), computer skills.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates will assist in recruiting study participants, running participants in experiments, coding data, data entry, library research.

Requirements

Preferred but not essential: Social psychology (psych 102); Health psychology (psych 101), computer skills.

Physics

Ania Bleszynski Jayich

Location:
Broida 4105
(805) 893-8089

Research Project

In this project, we aim to form a versatile quantum technology out of defects in diamond and mechanical resonators. We would like to characterize the strain-mediated interaction between the quantum mechanical spin degree of freedom of a diamond defect and the motion of a surface acoustic wave resonator.

Undergraduate Contribution

The undergraduate will be responsible for designing surface acoustic wave cavities and ismulating their properties in diamond. Furthermore, they will need to drive and detect motion on the GHz frequency scale using a laser doppler vibrometer or RF reflectometry.

Requirements

Undergraduate must be willing to spend 15 hours a week on this project. Should be competent with quantum mechanics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, electronics, and machine shop. Should enjoy building things and like to work!

Film and Media Studies

Peter Bloom

Location:
2413 SSMS

Research Project

I am creating a database-repository related to previous and ongoing research related to French and British colonial film and radio as well as other areas. The project will enable greater access to the material to students, and colleagues. It will also allow me to work with this material in a more careful manner.

Undergraduate Contribution

The student interested in working on this project will be involved in parsing and scanning historical documents that have been gathered from various archival sources from around the world. They will also be tagging each file in an established catalogued format. In addition, I will have you transform a large number of research photographs of documents and photographs from .jpg format to OCRed .pdf files, and appropriately labeled.

Requirements

Most of all, the person who works with me must be detail oriented, and own their own laptop that they would be using for this project.. They should also be available at least 5 hours per week during the quarter. You will be working with Adobe Acrobat for this project. Prior knowledge of Acrobat, a willingness to work with these documents, files, among other ephemera is important. The ability to read French would be an advantage.

Anthropology

Michelle Brown

Location:
HSSB 2045
893-4269

Research Project

This project examines energy balance, stress hormones, and personality in wild monkeys (redtail monkeys, blue monkeys, and grey-cheeked mangabeys in Kibale National Park, Uganda) in order to understand variation in cooperative and competitive behaviors. This research combines data from behavioral observations, hormone assays using urine and fecal samples, and botanical and vertebrate censuses.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate students will assist by learning and implementing the following tasks: cataloging photos; extracting subsets of data; processing fecal samples in preparation for hormone extraction; and participating in basic statistical and spatial analyses.

Requirements

See course requirements for ANTH 99 or ANTH 199RA. Must have basic proficiency with Microsoft Word and Excel, the ability to learn additional programs (Adobe Lightroom, FileMaker Pro, EndNote, and basic spatial analysis programs) quickly, and be extremely detail-oriented. Students are accepted for FRAP projects only if s/he has previously enrolled in a course taught by Prof. Brown (ANTH 103, 123, 153T) and received a grade of B or higher. Interested students should contact Prof. Brown by email (mbrown@anth.ucsb.edu) ***in the first week*** of the quarter in which you would like to participate, with the following information: your GPA, list of previous and current anthropology or EEMB courses you have taken, other lab/field experience, and why you are interested in this particular opportunity.

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