Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Sociology

John Foran

Location:
3417 SSMS
893-8199

Research Project

“The Climate Justice Project” is an ongoing collaboration of UCSB-affiliated students, graduates, and myself on the global climate justice movement. We have conducted a number of in-depth interviews with climate activists at the last five U.N. climate summits including at Paris in December 2015, when a global climate treaty was signed. Our challenge is to contribute to the efficacy of global civil society in building a social movement capable of forcing the governments of the world to negotiate a binding, ambitious, and just climate treaty to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that are warming the planet, which the “Paris Agreement” does not accomplish.

At this network’s core is the principle of climate justice: the desire that all humans claim responsibility for our impact on the world’s climate, so that communities may reclaim their rights to “live well” with healthy, creative lives rather than to simply “live better” or consume more, and that together we construct a future based on equity, deep democracy, and cooperation.  This involves unlocking the creativity of everyone to re-imagine the world in which we live in order to make way for new possibilities.

The Climate Justice Project is excited to be part of this life-affirming movement.  Among our research products and projects are reports, scholarly articles, and videos. Our work can be viewed at www.climatejusticeproject.com and at www.iicat.org.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates have been working on this project for several years, in a variety of capacities: transcribing audio and video interviews with climate justice activists; making research notes on key books, articles, and other documents; helping log and edit video footage for films in the making, including a full-length film on the global youth climate justice movement, tentatively called "Not Yet the End of the World."

Requirements

There are no prerequisites except an interest in the topic.

Lisa Hajjar

Location:
SSMS 3018

Research Project

I need help organizing the research I have been conducting over the past 15 years for a book project, The War in Court: The Legal Campaign against US Torture. Specifically, this research includes approximately 200 interviews with lawyers who have worked in some capacity to challenge the US torture program in the context of the "war on terror," as well as field notes from my observations at Guantanamo military commission trials, and conferences and other torture-related events. I need to create a searchable database of this research, a summary of each item, and an electronic scan of the materials.

Undergraduate Contribution

An undergraduate research assistant would use my materials to create the database, summarize each item, and produce electronic scans. The student will work with me to devise a framework for the searchable database and delineate the key elements to be included in summaries (e.g., names of interviewees, dates and locations, nature of interviewee's work, topics discussed in the interview, etc). This would provide the student with the opportunity to learn by my example how longitudinal qualitative research is conducted, and how to organize such research in a user-friendly manner for a book project.

Requirements

The student must be an upper-level student who has taken at least one of the following courses and earned a grade of B+ or higher: Soc 173 (Sociology of Law), Soc 173R (Sociology of Human Rights). The student must be highly organized, capable of learning how to use a database software (TBD), and interested in the topic of my research.

Professor Zakiya Luna

Location:
3409 Social Science and Media Studies

Research Project

Social movements scholars have consistently been interested in understanding the consequences of movements. Movements can shift public policy, create new identities, influence other movements’ goals and become part of the institutions they previously challenged such as government and higher education. When the phrase “reproductive justice” was coined in 1994 it represented an exciting paradigm shift away from the divisive abortion debate. Their vision was to focus their advocacy efforts on how issues of racism, homophobia, poverty, disability, and citizenship differently affected the people’s opportunities to have children (e.g., for same-sex couples) and to parent their own children (e.g., for incarcerated people). Fast forward to 2016: talk show hosts use the phrase one major city health department has taken on an RJ focus and major universities have RJ research centers. Using archival data, observation, interviews, and a unique dataset of media hits, this project explores how movement ideas become part of major social institutions, namely media and education. FRAP position is open to all students regardless of major but students with interest in research on social change, gender, race and/or law are especially encouraged to apply. Up to three students will be selected to be a part of the research team.

Undergraduate Contribution

Depending upon interests and skill, undergraduate research assistants will assist with a range of research activities including:

• Assist with database maintenance as appropriate to the student’s skill level

• Coding documents

• Convert physical documents to electronic files

• Download information from internet

• Engage in library and on-line research

• Gather publicly available information about individuals and organizations

• Perform targeted internet searches using key phrases

• Read research articles to increase familiarity with the field

• Transcribe audio recordings

• Write analytic memos

Requirements

• personal access to a computer

• personal access the internet;

• facility with MS Word including how to cut and paste from the web;

• facility with MS Excel;

• willing to learn Zotero and other digital filing or bibliographical database system

. • participate in research team meetings

• ability to follow directions

• comfort or willingness to learn about subject matter (reproduction, politics)

• commit an average of three hours a week to the research (flexibility for exams , etc)

Zakiya Luna

Location:
3409 Social Science and Media Studies

Research Project

Professor Luna and faculty collaborators nationwide are currently collecting surveys from participants in the 2017 Women’s March on Washington and in cities across the country, including: Austin, Boston, Los Angeles, Oakland, Philadelphia, Portland, St. Louis, and Santa Fe. Our purpose is to understand what brings people to participate in a march of this scale, and at a critical historical juncture in our country’s political landscape. For the first phase, we have developed a survey about the motivations and experiences that have brought millions of people to the national march in DC and other major cities. For a second phase we will conduct interviews with some participants. Finally, we are conducting social media analysis. FRAP position is open to all undergraduates in the college of Letters and Science with at least a 3.4 GPA . Up to five students will be selected to be a part of the FRAP research team through which you will learn new skills, meet new people and help produce sociological research. Students will register for Soc 99/Soc 199 through Sociology department procedure.Students with interest in research on social change, gender, race and/or law are especially encouraged to apply. [More details on project development: Within a week of the election of Donald J Trump to the US presidency, individual women began to post online suggesting “another march.” The prior women’s march, March for Women’s Lives, was held in 2004 in Washington D.C. with an estimated one million attendees, many of whom were working to defeat the reelection of George W. Bush. The March drew the attention of many media outlets and social movement scholars. Contrary to the many claims that the women’s movement was dead, the march demonstrated to a doubting public the continued relevance of the US women’s movement (Staggenborg and Taylor 2005). Internal to the women’s movement, the March was also significant since it was the first time the four major feminist organizations had joined together to produce a major event and minority women took a major role in the leadership and grassroots organizing (Luna 2010). While that March was not successful in defeating Bush, it continues to be held up within movement settings as a sign of possibility although , practically, many people have short memories or did not even know there had been a prior march. When the calls for another march to occur in D.C. on inauguration weekend 2017 were posted online, there were thousands of people who expressed interest. This is an excellent opportunity to gather comparison data, as well as to study the political engagement of people on a national level around ideas of gender equality, as well as around other stated social justice politics. In the 12 years since the last march, much has changed within the women’s movement and the broader political sphere. This project will expand theoretical understanding of social movements and people’s participation in protest action. The different locations give us the opportunity to compare political engagement in varying cultural and political climates around the United States and beyond.]

Undergraduate Contribution

Depending upon interests and skill, undergraduate research assistants will assist with a range of research activities including:

• Assist with database maintenance as appropriate to the student’s skill level (e.g. inputting survey information)
• Download information from internet
• Engage in library and on-line research
• Attend and gather data at events such as one of the women’s marched on January 21, 2017
• Gather publicly available information about individuals and organizations
• Perform targeted internet searches using key phrases
• Read research articles to increase familiarity with the field
• Transcribe audio recordings
• Write brief analytic memos

Requirements

Requirements are:
• Attend training session for data collection in-person or virtually
• Attend one of the Women’s Marches in CA on January 21, 2017 to collect data from participants (some costs are covered)
• Attend debriefing meeting
• Personal access to a computer
• Personal access the internet;
• Facility with MS Word including how to cut and paste from the web;
• Facility with MS Excel;
• Willing to learn Zotero and other digital filing or bibliographical database system.
• Participate in periodic research team meetings
• Ability to follow directions
• Comfort or willingness to learn about subject matter (gender, politics)
• Commit an average of three hours a week to the research during the quarter (flexibility for exams , etc)

France Winddance Twine

Location:
3320 Social Sciences & Media Studies Building
893-3118

Research Project

How do 'geek girls' negotiate masculinity and gender inequality in the male dominated tech industry? Interviews with 65 female and male tech workers employed in the San Francisco industry have been completed. This qualitative study draws upon life history interviews, participate observation at two Tech Inclusion conferences, and an analysis of tech industry reports, to provide an intersectional analysis of the ways that race, gender and sexuality shape the experiences of tech workers. This research will be published in a book that is under contract with Cambridge University Press.

Undergraduate Contribution

This research could benefit from the assistance of a disciplined and organized undergraduate research assistant, interested in sociology of work, technology industry and gender inequality, who is willing to do: 1) library database searches for journal articles, books, and related digital and print materials, 2) Transcribe interviews, and/or 3) identify and locate documentary films and YouTube videos that depict the challenges and experiences of female tech workers.

Requirements

Students must be a Sociology major or a Feminist Studies major. They must have earned a B+ in at least 4 upper division courses. Students must have completed SOC 1, SOC 99, and one of the following SOC 108A, 108B, 108C or 108 F. Students must provide a letter of recommendation from a faculty member or graduate student instructor in the Sociology Department, who is familiar with their work.

Howard Winant

Location:
SSMS Bldg 3005

Research Project

RACIAL FORMATION THEORY/CRITICAL RACE THEORY (AND PRACTICE!)

The UCSB Center for New Racial Studies offers opportunities for undergraduates to develop their research, theory, and practice skills in area of race and racism.

We will welcome and help develop projects proposed by undergraduate students oriented to race and racism issues. Projects may take the form of independent study, supervised internship with an appropriate community organization, group research activity, or paid work-study activity with the UCSB CNRS. We are particularly interested in projects related to immigrants rights, racial profiling, incarceration, low-wage labor, race/class/sex-gender intersectionality, and environmental racism.  We are also seeking students with web skills to help develop our site.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate contribution will depend on the type of work done. All academic work will be rigorous and will demand significant writing commitment. Community-based work will be conducted under academic/organizational supervision and will require meeting agreed-upon hourly commitments in the field and producing agreed-upon writing assignments. Work-study assignments will vary.

Requirements

Students interested should arrange to meet with Professor Howard Winant; email him hwinant@soc.ucsb.edu.

Students will generally have junior or above status and a declared major. GPA of 3.3 or above will generally be expected.