Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Religious Studies

Joseph Blankholm

Location:
HSSB 3049

Research Project

I'm in the process of revalidating a database I built with a colleague in 2012 that collects basic information on all of the more than 1,400 local nonbeliever communities in the United States. We intend to use this updated database for a longitudinal study of these groups so we can understand whether they are growing in number and also what factors might lead to their formation. We recently published an article in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion based on the 2012 version, which demonstrates that nonbeliever communities are more likely to form in counties where there are proportionally more evangelicals.

Undergraduate Contribution

An undergraduate research assistant would contact groups listed in the 2012 database by phone or email in order to collect basic information and assess the group's level of activity. The student will be provided with email and phone scripts, including a basic questionnaire. This information will be used to update/revalidate the database.

Requirements

Students must have basic proficiency with Microsoft Excel and experience conducting qualitative research, including interviews. Ideally, the student would also have a strong interest in the area of research. Majors in Religious Studies, Sociology, and Anthropology preferred (though not a requirement).

David Walker

Location:
HSSB 3086

Research Project

I am writing a chapter titled "Battling Brothers and The Mormon Giant: Wrestling, Villainy, and the Face-Turn of Modern Mormonism," on the subject of Mormon representations in popular culture -- and in professional wrestling, especially -- and the ways in which, contrary to some expectations, religions (generally) and Mormonism (in particular) have capitalized on their wrestling-ring projections and contestations.

Undergraduate Contribution

The undergraduate research assistant would conduct online research (e.g., looking at blogs, newspapers, and journals) and interviews with persons invested in the religious realms & representations of professional wrestling. 

Requirements

RS 7, RS 151B, RS 150B, RS 147, or equivalent. Familiarity with Mormon history and historical research methods.