Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Environmental Studies

Peter Alagona

Location:
Bren 4013

Research Project

Scientists and conservationists have long viewed cities as the antithesis of nature, and as destroyers of wildlife habitat. Over the past two decades, however, wild animals have appeared in American cities and in cities throughout the highly developed world in numbers not seen for generations. Urban ecosystems are some of the most dynamic and interesting spaces for understanding ecological change in the Anthropocene, but our understanding of these systems remains in its infancy. We know remarkably little about how wild animals travel, breed, consume resources, establish territory, and use the built environment in urban spaces. We know even less about how such animals interact with humans, or what people think about them. This project aims to produce the first major book to explore the history of wildlife in American cities designed to reach a broad audience.

Undergraduate Contribution

FRAP undergraduate assistants will assist in the creation of a bibliography and database of source materials on the history of wildlife in American cities. 

Requirements

Successful applicants must have excellent reading comprehension and writing skills.

David Pellow

Location:
4304 Bren Hall
(619) 488-7838

Research Project

**Not taking on new research assistants until Spring 2017**
This project involves the study of the links among the U.S. prison system, impacts on local/regional/national/global ecosystems, impacts on communities of color and working class communities where prisons are located and where the majority of prisoners are from, and their implications for social and environmental justice movements. Specifically, we are interested in asking what are the effects of prison construction and maintenance on public and environmental health and what can be done to address these problems? This project aims to provide data and collaborative opportunities to people interested in ending mass incarceration and promoting environmental justice.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate members of the research collective will be expected to conduct targeted internet searches to find a wide range of sources on the topic, write up annotated bibliographies, and compile lists of organizations and individuals working on these issues.

Requirements

Requirements are: 1) personal access to a computer and the internet; 2) facility with MS Word including how to cut and paste from the web; 3) attention to detail; 4) the ability to follow directions. It is also a helpful if you are willing to learn Zotero or other digital filing or bibliographical database system.