Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

English

Felice Blake

Location:
SH 2702

Research Project

My project examines representations of intracommunal conflict occupy a central place in African American fiction from The Great Black Migration to the contemporary post-Civil Rights era. I analyze intracommunal conflicts emerging in Black literature during key moments of Black struggles for racial justice. The project's main argument is that representations of intracommunal conflict in African American fiction are critical sites where the realities of racist exclusion and subordination are negotiated, arbitrated, inculcated, and resisted.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates contribute valuable research about 20th century movements for racial justice. Student researchers provide background information about the history of racial segregation and discrimination, as well as the internal dynamics of racial communities from the 1920s to the present.

Requirements

Familiarity with library databases and search engines, some knowledge of African American history and culture

Jeremy Douglass

Location:
South Hall 2518

Research Project

The Transverse Reading Project is studying the media structures in comic page layouts, poetic rhyme schemes, and video game plots. This phase focuses on gamebooks -- that is, playable print stories. This project will data mine, analyze, and visualize branching plot structures in hundreds of interactive stories, principally gamebooks from the Demian Katz Gamebook Collection.

Undergraduate Contribution

Researchers will receive training and conduct archival research at UCSB Library Special Collections, encode game narratives, map interactive stories, and participate in data analysis, information visualization, and write up research results.

Requirements

Reliable and eager to learn. Archival research requires being detail-oriented and organized. No technical skills required, but researchers should be open to working with software and learning new things. Interests in literature, games, and interactive media are an asset.

Patricia Fumerton

Location:
2506 South Hall
708-0540

Research Project

English Broadside Ballad Archive, http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu. This project is devoted to mounting online facsimile images, citations, transcriptions, and recordings of broadside ballads of the seventeenth century and earlier. Broadside ballads are large sheets (hence "broad) on which are printed many illustrations, a song, and a tune title.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates work alongside graduate students to create "facsimile transcriptions" (in which the student opens up a facsimile of the ballad in Photoshop and a transcription in Word, and then carefully replaces the original text of the ballad with the transcribed text, matching font size and spacing and preserving the ballad's ornamentation). Students also help catalogue ballads and convert ballads into TEI/XML using a handy easy-to-follow program called X-Balled. Students in the process learn much about early printing techniques, popular culture, Photoshop, and text encoding.

Requirements

Detail-oriented, reliable, and a basic knowledge of Photoshop.

Bishnupriya Ghosh

Location:
South Hall 2607A
893-3478

Research Project

The Catalyst Project supports four research assistants, members of the editorial board for the literary arts magazine, responsible for producing the 2015-16 issues of the magazine.

Undergraduate Contribution

The research assistants lead the production of the Catalyst magazine and related arts events in Isla Vista. This includes leading the writing, designing, and printing of the magazine copies as well as organizing and hosting events. The costs include designing and printing (5000+ per issue), art supplies (around $200-400), and events supplies (around $300-400).

Requirements

Editorial skills
Technical or design skills
Organizational ability
Collaborative capacity

Andrew Griffin

Location:
South Hall 2524

Research Project

The project works in collaboration with Director Patricia Fumerton to expand research on the English Broadside Ballad Archive. The project makes public facsimile images of early English ballads printed during the 16th and 17th centuries, and this expansion works to digitize previously created facsimile transcriptions into modernized replicas of the early modern print on the original broadside ballads.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduates work alongside graduate students to carefully transcribe the original text of the ballads, in order to convert that transcribed text into high quality digital replicas in Photoshop. Students in the process learn much about early modern print culture, early modern popular culture, and archival transcription practices.

Requirements

90 units of course credit, 3.0 GPA. In addition, students should be reliable, and have a detail-oriented work ethic and basic knowledge of Microsoft Office and Adobe.

Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook

Location:
South Hall 2503

Research Project

The "Early Modern British Theater: Access" project is creating a searchable database that collects and catalogs multimedia resources relating to British theater and dramatic literature, 1500-1800. Our goal is to help instructors and students get a sense of the collaborative and multisensorial aspects of theater in the period. Part of our team research involves identifying current 'best practices' for digital humanities projects. We aim to 'go public' in early 2015; right now our 'front end' (only) is available athttp://embta.english.ucsb.edu/about.

Undergraduate Contribution

Following EMBTA protocols and under graduate-student supervision, undergrad team members will review and standardize the items already identified for the database. They will also identify and report on new resources (databases, performance materials, other publications).

Requirements

Reliable; detail-oriented. Interest in theater studies and / or digital humanities projects a plus!

Melody Jue

Location:
SH 2704

Research Project

My project is about developing a theory of media specific to the ocean environment. I look at key terms in media theory--information, database, inscription, interface--and look at how our understanding of them necessarily changes in the representations of the ocean (science fiction, film, and digital media). As a part of the project, I want to develop a digital archive of ocean science fiction for future scholars.

Undergraduate Contribution

Student researchers will compile an annotated bibliography of ocean-related science fiction novels, short stories, film, games, and digital media. 

Requirements

Student(s) should be organized, reliable, curious, and be adept at using search engines/databases and finding obscure material!

Alan Liu

Location:
South Hall 2521
(805) 893-7488

Research Project

The Arnhold Collaborative Research Group that I lead in the English Department is titled "Making the Humanities Public." The group researches media coverage of the humanities with the assistance of a machine-learning "topic model" of thousands of newspaper articles, draws up analyses and recommendations for humanities advocacy based on its findings, and builds digital and other projects that act on its recommendations (e.g., projects that demonstrate how to represent the humanities in a new light to the public).

Undergraduate Contribution

Working under my supervision and that of a graduate student, undergraduates collaboratively use analyses and findings from research into media coverage of the humanities to design projects that show how the humanities can be presented in new ways to public audiences--e.g., with new narratives, evidence, examples, etc. The imagined audiences for these projects include legislators, journalists, business people, parents, and others.

Requirements

Students need to have been involved in the preceding Winter 2017 "Making the Humanities Public" Arnhold Collaborative Research Group. The English 199RA associated with the project in Spring 2017 builds from the earlier research activities of the project.

Swati Rana

Location:
SH 2706
893-7488

Research Project

This project is a comparative study of early-twentieth century immigrant literature, including work by Afro-Caribbean, Arab, Filipino, Latino, and South Asian writers. Chapters explore the formal construction of minoritarian identity in a pre-civil rights U.S. framework, in conjunction with the varied diasporic and transnational histories that shape these texts.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate researchers would collect, review, and summarize books and articles, and develop annotated bibliographies for relevant research fields. They may also review the archives of individual writers as well as archives of early California immigrant history. In the process, undergraduate researchers would develop a broad familiarity with literary criticism and theory, ethnic literary history, as well as U.S. race and immigration history, and would have an opportunity to define and hone their research methods.

Requirements

Undergraduate researchers should be reliable and detail-oriented, and have some course background in literary study, immigration, race, and/or global studies.