Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies

Sabine Frühstück

Location:
HSSB 2232

Research Project

Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japan. In nine short chapters, this book will provide an introduction to the experiences of and debates about sex, gender, and sexuality with regards to males and females in modern and contemporary Japan. It will draw from and integrate historical, ethnographic, and cultural studies scholarship and emphasize moments of debate and conflict. In addition, it will include critical assessments of a select number of black and white visuals. Each chapter will be accompanied by both a short bibliography of key scholarship and a list of literary and film examples that represent or address the historical moments and issues described in the text—all in order to facilitate further exploration by a broad range of readers in and outside the academy.

Undergraduate Contribution

Reference search and verification, creation of a bibliography, summaries of publications, image searches.

Requirements

Excellent English, basic research and documentation skills, reliability, time management and communication skills. Good Japanese language skills a plus.

Ann-elise Lewallen

Location:
HSSB 2256

Research Project

1) Project one, Global Cultures of Marginalization: Race, Gender, and Indigenous Women’s Empowerment examines Ainu women’s engagement with civil society and their critique of the sex/gender structures of both ethnic Japanese and Ainu society. Women use multiple discrimination as a tool of analysis to assess how the complex relations between ethnicity, race, and gender intersect and may be transformed into more compound forms of discrimination.

2) Project two, Space Beyond the Nation: Digital Ainu and Indigenous Modernity, seeks to analyze how transnational spaces facilitate Ainu in negotiating global indigenous citizenship and positions as Japanese citizens. Transnational spaces are central to Ainu negotiations of indigenous citizenship and essential to overcoming discrimination anxiety, or a paralyzing fear of racism, inside Japan. Increasingly, these transnational spaces are being constructed within the digital domains of interactive social media wherein Ainu youth build on the translocal networks borne from global exchange.

Undergraduate Contribution

For the first project I seek students who have a working knowledge of Japanese to assist with organizing communications with Ainu women in Japan. Next, I seek students to assist with a literature review, to work on a broad survey of the literature on indigenous women and intersectionality, and to assist with summarizing the main contributions of each article.

For the second project, I seek students to assist me as I embark on a data-mining project in mining the social media universe for discussions of indigeneity, sovereignty, racism/discrimination, and especially for linkages between Ainu and other indigenous youth overseas. I plan to conduct data-mining of Twitter as well as Mixi and LINE (Japanese applications). Knowledge of the softwares Gnep or Datasift, or programming, or programming languages such as Python are welcome.

Requirements

I seek a student who is proficient in Japanese AND
English. Other skills sought include knowledge of the softwares
"R," Gnep or Datasift, or programming, or programming languages
such as Python are welcome.

Hsiao-Jung Yu

Location:
2239 HSSB

Research Project

The Chinese language today includes a number of new words, phrases and expressions, some are due to language contact with other languages such as English and Japanese. This project is to collect and study the new words coined from the 18th century to present day and to study various contact situations and their impact on the Chinese language, as well as their reflections of and associations with Chinese culture and society in the 21st century.

Undergraduate Contribution

Language Contact and Change in the 21st Chinese

Student assistants will help collect and recording existing data in Chinese literary and historical documents from the 18th century to the modern era. They will also help prepare various charts and diagrams of the data collected by the professor/supervisor and also help enter data in the database.

Requirements

Chinese language (native/near native)
Chinese 26 or Chinese 124B or equivalent