Faculty Research Assistance Program (FRAP) Directory

The FRAP Directory allows students to identify UCSB faculty who are looking for undergraduate students to participate in their research projects or creative activities. Please use the links below to find opportunities by discipline. Students, if your desired discipline is not listed, please contact the Undergraduate Research Initiatives office at 805-893-3090 or urca@ltsc.ucsb.edu for assistance. Faculty, if you would like to post your research or creative activity opportunity, please complete the online submission form.

Anthropology

Michelle Brown

Location:
HSSB 2045
893-4269

Research Project

This project examines energy balance, stress hormones, and personality in wild monkeys (redtail monkeys, blue monkeys, and grey-cheeked mangabeys in Kibale National Park, Uganda) in order to understand variation in cooperative and competitive behaviors. This research combines data from behavioral observations, hormone assays using urine and fecal samples, and botanical and vertebrate censuses.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate students will assist by learning and implementing the following tasks: cataloging photos; extracting subsets of data; processing fecal samples in preparation for hormone extraction; and participating in basic statistical and spatial analyses.

Requirements

See course requirements for ANTH 99 or ANTH 199RA. Must have basic proficiency with Microsoft Word and Excel, the ability to learn additional programs (Adobe Lightroom, FileMaker Pro, EndNote, and basic spatial analysis programs) quickly, and be extremely detail-oriented. Students are accepted for FRAP projects only if s/he has previously enrolled in a course taught by Prof. Brown (ANTH 103, 123, 153T) and received a grade of B or higher. Interested students should contact Prof. Brown by email (mbrown@anth.ucsb.edu) ***in the first week*** of the quarter in which you would like to participate, with the following information: your GPA, list of previous and current anthropology or EEMB courses you have taken, other lab/field experience, and why you are interested in this particular opportunity.

Jeffrey Hoelle

Location:
HSSB 2073
893-4244

Research Project

The objective of this project is to increase understanding of the cultural practices and beliefs of UCSB students and residents of Isla Vista. Student research projects from previous classes and other sources will be compiled and organized into a profile of IV culture, including topics such as ritual, gender, diet, conflict, subgroups, leisure, and language. All information will be posted into an online database that will serve as a learning tool for anthropology students and a source of information for the general public and prospective students. Advanced students and those with Portuguese language skills may assist with ongoing research projects focusing on human-environment interactions, locally and in the Brazilian Amazon.

Undergraduate Contribution

•Assist with the creation of online database on local culture (editing, organizing, posting to site, interpretation of results) •Data entry and basic analysis •Local data collection, compilation of bibliographic resources, scanning, copying, taking photographs, basic content analysis, and retrieval of resources. •Students with Portuguese language skills may assist with review of Brazilian sources and coordinate with Brazilian partners and research subjects.

Requirements

Open to students from all majors, as long as they have taken ANTH 2. Applicants should have basic office skills (MS word, excel) and an interest in developing methodological skills, conducting fieldwork and data analysis. Those with advanced statistical training and Portuguese language are encouraged to apply. If interested, please contact hoelle@anth.ucsb.edu. In your message, please include the following: year, major, anthro classes taken, relevant experience, and why you want to participate in the project. Approved students will receive an add code for 1 unit of credit of ANTH 199 (each unit= 3 hrs./ week x 10 weeks in qtr= 30 hrs. total).

Amber VanDerwarker

Location:
HSSB 1038
893-8604

Research Project

This project seeks to understand how chronic and intensified warfare affected peoples’ abilities to produce enough food to feed themselves and their communities. The region of interest is the Central Illinois River Valley during the 12th century, a period intensive warfare and raiding throughout ancient North America. One of the sites that the project is currently examining was once a large, fortified village (Orendorf Site) that was repeatedly burned to the ground by violent aggressors. The site was excavated in the 1970s, and we will be processing and analyzing the food remains recovered from one of these burned occupations. There are assemblages from additional sites in this region as well, for which plant and animal bone assemblages require identification and analysis.

Undergraduate Contribution

Through participation in this project students may develop many archaeological lab skills including:

  • how to use a flotation system to recover macrobotanicals and small faunal remains
  • how to recognize both faunal and floral remains
  • taking metric measurements of carbonized plant remains via specialized computer/microscope software accessioning modern specimens in the comparative collection
  • sorting small archaeological fauna from flotation samples by taxonomic class (fish, mammal, bird, amphibian, reptile).

Requirements

You may enroll in ANTH 194P for 1-4 units. For each unit of credit you must work three hours per week, or a total of 30 hours per quarter (ten weeks long). The lab is generally open 9am-5pm Mon-Wed, and Friday mornings. Scheduling of lab time within these hours is flexible. There is no course work requirement outside of the lab. However, if you must miss a work period for any reason, you are obligated to make up the time through arrangement with the instructor.

Consent of the Instructor is required for enrollment. Prior coursework in archaeology is preferred but not required. Please contactvanderwarker@anth.ucsb.edu if you are interested in participating in this project. Make sure to include information such as your GPA, Anthropology/Archaeology courses you have taken, other lab/field experience, and why you are interested in this particular opportunity. Add codes are currently available.

Casey Walsh

Location:
HSSB 2081
893-2339

Research Project

Agriculture in California is confronting a water crisis with both environmental and social drivers. Climate change and globalized agriculture are combining to increase the demand for groundwater and the depletion of aquifers. Conflicts have emerged in recent years in the Central Coast region of California as expanding agricultural production has led to increased demand for subsoil water. In this project we analyze the social use and management of groundwater in this region of California, especially where wine grapes are grown.

Undergraduate Contribution

Undergraduate research assistants will create a bibliography for this project, that will include government documents, published scholarly works, and newspapers/magazine articles. If possible, undergraduates will assist with fieldwork, including interviews in person and by telephone.

Requirements

1) Anthropology Major
2) 90 units completed
3) 3.0 GPA for preceding three quarters
4) Anth 2 completed
5) 2 upper division courses in Anthropology completed.
6) Consent of the Instructor

Gregory Wilson

Location:
HSSB 1036

Research Project

This project investigates how and why the complex prehistoric society of Cahokia extended its influence over the North American midcontinent in the early 12th century A.D.. Cahokia, near modern-day St. Louis, Missouri, was the largest Pre-Columbian city in North America (AD 1050–1375) and its inhabitants spread aspects of Mississippian culture as far north as Wisconsin and Minnesota. However, little is understood about how Cahokians initiated these distant interactions, and how and why local groups participated in them. Recent archaeological excavations at the Audrey North village site in the lower Illinois River Valley uncovered two artifact filled Native American houses and numerous storage pits dating to a period of intensive cultural negotiations among Cahokians and local native American groups.  The analysis of these materials provides a great opportunity to better understand this culture contact dynamic.  This is a great experience for students interested in gaining basic artifact analysis skills as well as a nuanced understanding of the exciting Pre-Columbian history of Mississippian culture.
 
 

Undergraduate Contribution

The processing and analysis of artifacts recovered from the excavation of one thousand year old Native American houses and associated features from this summer's excavations at the Audrey site village located one hour north of the modern day city of St. Louis.

Requirements

You may enroll in ANTH 194P for 1-4 units. For each unit of credit you must work three hours per week, or a total of 30 hours per quarter (ten weeks long). The lab is generally open 9am-5pm Mon-Wed, and Friday mornings. Scheduling of lab time within these hours is flexible. There is no course work requirement outside of the lab. However, if you must miss a work period for any reason, you are obligated to make up the time through arrangement with the instructor.
 
Consent of the Instructor is required for enrollment. Please contact gdwilson@anth.ucsb if you are interested in participating in this project. Make sure to include information such as your GPA, Anthropology/Archaeology courses you have taken, other lab/field experience, and why you are interested in this particular opportunity. Add codes are currently available.

Chicana and Chicano Studies, Anthropology

Gerardo Aldana

Location:
1710 South Hall

Research Project

Tamuyal is a mobile device app intended to provide a culturally relevant introduction to STEM and the UCSB campus. Visiting K-12 students enter the Tamuyal game environment to learn about UCSB's ecology as well as the academic programs available for undergraduate study.

Undergraduate Contribution

The game incorporates different types of information and can therefore benefit from students interested in: app programming (Unity, C#); ecological modeling/simulation; environmental sensor data; ancient Mesoamerican culture; K-12 STEM educational outreach; 3d and 2d digital art.

Requirements

Interest/curiosity is the main requirement. Training is available.